Book Navigation

Changes in safety attitude and relationship to decreased postoperative morbidity and mortality following implementation of a checklist-based surgical safety intervention.

Overview
Title:
Changes in safety attitude and relationship to decreased postoperative morbidity and mortality following implementation of a checklist-based surgical safety intervention.
Authors:
Haynes AB, Weiser TG, Berry WR, Lipsitz SR, Breizat AH, Dellinger EP, Dziekan G, Herbosa T, Kibatala PL, Lapitan MC, Merry AF, Reznick RK, Taylor B, Vats A, Gawande AA
Journal:
BMJ Qual Saf
Publication date:
2011
Volume:
20
Issue:
1
First page:
102
Last page:
7
ISSN:
2044-5423
Link to pubmed:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228082
Publication type:
Journal
Free text

Objectives To assess the relationship between changes in clinician attitude and changes in postoperative outcomes following a checklist-based surgical safety intervention. Design Pre- and post intervention survey. Setting Eight hospitals participating in a trial of a WHO surgical safety checklist. Participants Clinicians actively working in the designated study operating rooms at the eight hospitals. Survey instrument Modified operating-room version Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Main outcome measures Change in mean safety attitude score and correlation between change in safety attitude score and change in postoperative outcomes, plus clinician opinion of checklist efficacy and usability. Results Clinicians in the preintervention phase (n=281) had a mean SAQ score of 3.91 (on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 representing better safety attitude), while the postintervention group (n=257) had a mean of 4.01 (p=0.0127). The degree of improvement in mean SAQ score at each site correlated with a reduction in postoperative complication rate (r=0.7143, p=0.0381). The checklist was considered easy to use by 80.2% of respondents, while 19.8% felt that it took a long time to complete, and 78.6% felt that the programme prevented errors. Overall, 93.4% would want the checklist used if they were undergoing operation. Conclusions Improvements in postoperative outcomes were associated with improved perception of teamwork and safety climate among respondents, suggesting that changes in these may be partially responsible for the effect of the checklist. Clinicians held the checklist in high regard and the overwhelming majority would want it used if they were undergoing surgery themselves.

Preview

Changes in safety attitude and relationship to decreased postoperative morbidity and mortality following implementation of a checklist-based surgical safety intervention. Haynes AB, Weiser TG, Berry WR, Lipsitz SR, Breizat AH, Dellinger EP et al. BMJ Qual Saf 2011; 20(1):102-7.

Page last updated: Apr 02, 2011
Copyright © 2002-2016 Guidelines International Network.
All rights reserved

The Guidelines International Network is formally constituted as a Scottish Guarantee Company under Company Number SC243691 and recognised as a Scottish Charity under Scottish Charity Number SC034047 with its Registered Office at J. & H. Mitchell W.S., 51 Atholl Road, Pitlochry, Perthshire PH16 5BU, Scotland.

Back to top