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Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

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Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Jenna McEwan at March 23. 2016

Overall Aim

The aim of this discussion (brainstorming session) is to get ideas from G-I-N members from all over the world on how to engage stakeholders for the Africa community.  We currently seek a variety of stakeholders including ministries of health, development agencies, healthcare consumers, clinicians and knowledge translation institutions. We hope that they can share their experiences and challenges and also link us with possible funders for some of our activities especially the capacity building in development and evaluation of clinical practice guidelines in Africa.

Topic: Stakeholder engagement

Objective:

i)     Learn from other communities and working groups their stakeholder engagement strategies

ii)    How to engage Stakeholders and turn it into a membership drive

iii)   Share experiences and challenges of stakeholder engagement and how to overcome them

iv)   How to put together stakeholder forums – methodologies to encourage membership

 

Target group:

i)       G-I-N Africa Community members

ii)     Working Groups especially LMIC

iii)    The entire G-I-N family (all G-I-N members)

 

Role of G-I-N members:

The members will give ideas and suggest strategies of stakeholder engagement and membership drives.

Timeline: March – end of April 2016

 Contact: Irene Maweu at imaweu@yahoo.com or Sue Huckson at charmanrd@gmail.com  

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at March 23. 2016

We will also appreciate any document that you may have put together on strategies of stakeholder engagement.

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Sue Huckson at March 29. 2016

Providing the strong case for change often comes from a story that to engages stakeholders. Great start would be to build a bank of persuasive stories of improvement in health outcomes or process outcomes through uptake of guideline recommendations that make a difference to individuals, the community and the system is a great start.

I found this guide helpful when shaping a story; 

  • Start with a short statement to catch the readers attention, followed by 
  • What the problem was/is, 
  • Why it matters (to whom), 
  • How the change was implemented,  
  • Why that specific change, and finally 
  • the difference it made which echos the opening statement.

There are many amazing stories to share, not each example will be able to be replicated completely but there will be lessons to be learnt from each other. 

Sue

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Patrick Mbah Okwen at April 05. 2016

Stakeholders in Africa: Key stakeholders are the users of health services, however these users are very vulnerable especially because of knowledge asymmetry which is very acute in Africa. They may not even be able to read or study evidence or be able to fully participate in stakeholder meetings. This means the regulators of the health systems which in most of Africa is the ministry of health will play a key role.

The body of evidence needed to inform decision making is gradually becoming available but using these to inform decision is still a challenge. The ministries of health could facilitate this if they are engaged in stakeholder meetings. This will however require that the scientific committee is able to digest evidence to policy makers eg GRADEing evidence and use of evidence to decision frameworks. This role can be facilitated by bodies like GIN, Cochrane or WHO. The WHO has taken significant lead in this especially with guidelines for infectious diseases like TB, HIV and malaria. But these are just a few. We also need to look at non communicable diseases.

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Paul Makau at April 06. 2016

Hi,

I would suggest that contacting hospital medical and nursing directors and alumni groups of medical schools would be a useful way to increase visibility of the GIN activities. In Kenya few institutions implement guidelines systematically with even fewer participating in guideline development.

drmakau@gmail.com

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at April 08. 2016

Thank you Dr. Makau for being part of this discussion. It is appreciated.

have you been involved in guidelines review or development? if yes what were the challenges and/or successes.

If No, why do you think the developers have not reached out to those who can add value?

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at April 08. 2016

Thank you Sue, for the pointer into having a story and providing us with a storyline.

Do you think the story should be the same or each stakeholder category should  have its own story?

 

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Mwebaze Kanaahe Brian Bilal at April 10. 2016

HI, I think we could also include prehospital care institutions. I work in prehospital care, and calling them clinical guidlines would keep professionals like me on the bench. Cheers

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Patrick Mbah Okwen at April 11. 2016

Hi Paul,

Thanks for your inputs. I would be interested in knowing which guidelines these few institutions implementing guidelines currently use, how they got them and if patients are aware that these guidelines do exist. Do you also believe there is a best practice story for guidelines use that could be of interest the other guidelines users (policy makers, practitioners and patients)?

Patrick

 

Previously Paul Makau wrote:

Hi,

I would suggest that contacting hospital medical and nursing directors and alumni groups of medical schools would be a useful way to increase visibility of the GIN activities. In Kenya few institutions implement guidelines systematically with even fewer participating in guideline development.

drmakau@gmail.com

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Patrick Mbah Okwen at April 11. 2016

HI Brian,

Sure prehospital care guidance is included in clinical guidelines. We are also looking at guidelines for public health interventions not just guidelines within clinician's office. I understand you have been doing a lot of work on guidance for First Aid and this could be very interesting to share. How did you engage stakeholders in the process for example? What was the situation before you started? How did your intervention bring change?

Patrick

 

Previously Mwebaze Kanaahe Brian Bilal wrote:

HI, I think we could also include prehospital care institutions. I work in prehospital care, and calling them clinical guidlines would keep professionals like me on the bench. Cheers

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at April 12. 2016

Good morning Brian,

Great to have you in this discussion.

Would you kindly elaborate on your comment about the prehospital instituions? 

How best do you think this can be done?  what are your experiences?  

What about the guidleines there - should they be looked into? 

 

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Margot Fleuren at April 29. 2016

Hi Irene,

My experience in involving stakeholders only relates to The Netherlands, so I don't know if this would be of any use.

Starting In 1999, a year after the first Dutch preventive youth health care guideline was published, we first developed a draft national implementation plan (theory driven) connecting development, implementation and evaluation. The plan included the design of an infrastructure which allowed us to reach all stakeholders at the national, regional and local level. Secondly, we fine-tuned this plan - this is an on-going activity - by involving all stakeholders (among others 5500 preventive youth health care doctors, nurses and doctor's assistance, the professional organizations, the Ministry of Health, the Health Care Inspectorate). Representatives were approached by the snowball method. We started by interviewing the professionals - this would be suitable for The Netherlands - and asked them questions like "Are you aware of any national guidelines"? "Are you aware of local protocols?" "Do you have access to them?" "How are you normally informed about guidelines or protocols and by whom?" "What would be the best way to organise this?" The next step was connecting the professionals so they could exchange their experiences and learn from each other.

Crucial was: a) having the right connections and basically building an extended network for involving all stakeholders, b) connecting the development  implementation and evaluation, c) creating an infrastructure and last but not least, d) making a speadsheet, showing how much a systematic approach of guideline development and implementation would cost and what the benefits would be for children. It showed that the Ministry of Health would actually save money by using a systematic approach.

Please find enclosed an article about how we proceeded.

Margot Fleuren


 

 

Previously Irene Maweu wrote:

We will also appreciate any document that you may have put together on strategies of stakeholder engagement.

Attachments

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Margot Fleuren at April 29. 2016

Dear Sue,

I agree that these short stories work really well, sometimes also in combination of some of the strategies / techniques Paulo Freire (famous Brazilian educator) used for creating awareness.

Margot Fleuren

 

Previously Sue Huckson wrote:

Providing the strong case for change often comes from a story that to engages stakeholders. Great start would be to build a bank of persuasive stories of improvement in health outcomes or process outcomes through uptake of guideline recommendations that make a difference to individuals, the community and the system is a great start.

I found this guide helpful when shaping a story; 

  • Start with a short statement to catch the readers attention, followed by 
  • What the problem was/is, 
  • Why it matters (to whom), 
  • How the change was implemented,  
  • Why that specific change, and finally 
  • the difference it made which echos the opening statement.

There are many amazing stories to share, not each example will be able to be replicated completely but there will be lessons to be learnt from each other. 

Sue

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at May 03. 2016

Thank you Margot for the document and for you input that you have shared.

You may have done the work in The Netherlands, but I think we can still borrow some strategies from your work that fits our african settings.

I like the fact that you showed the Ministry of Health that it can save money by following a systematic approach.  

 

 

Previously Margot Fleuren wrote:

Hi Irene,

My experience in involving stakeholders only relates to The Netherlands, so I don't know if this would be of any use.

Starting In 1999, a year after the first Dutch preventive youth health care guideline was published, we first developed a draft national implementation plan (theory driven) connecting development, implementation and evaluation. The plan included the design of an infrastructure which allowed us to reach all stakeholders at the national, regional and local level. Secondly, we fine-tuned this plan - this is an on-going activity - by involving all stakeholders (among others 5500 preventive youth health care doctors, nurses and doctor's assistance, the professional organizations, the Ministry of Health, the Health Care Inspectorate). Representatives were approached by the snowball method. We started by interviewing the professionals - this would be suitable for The Netherlands - and asked them questions like "Are you aware of any national guidelines"? "Are you aware of local protocols?" "Do you have access to them?" "How are you normally informed about guidelines or protocols and by whom?" "What would be the best way to organise this?" The next step was connecting the professionals so they could exchange their experiences and learn from each other.

Crucial was: a) having the right connections and basically building an extended network for involving all stakeholders, b) connecting the development  implementation and evaluation, c) creating an infrastructure and last but not least, d) making a speadsheet, showing how much a systematic approach of guideline development and implementation would cost and what the benefits would be for children. It showed that the Ministry of Health would actually save money by using a systematic approach.

Please find enclosed an article about how we proceeded.

Margot Fleuren


 

 

Previously Irene Maweu wrote:

We will also appreciate any document that you may have put together on strategies of stakeholder engagement.

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by Irene Maweu at May 03. 2016

Hallo Sue,

I earlier agreed that storylines are really a great way of presenting a situation.

I wondered if a drama series would bring out  this (our) storyline?

A Drama series which is both audio and visual, with the right script writers and actors, it could help understand the issues of guidelines and be replicable in any language, and community and this would help drive the point home.

What do you think?

 

Previously Sue Huckson wrote:

Providing the strong case for change often comes from a story that to engages stakeholders. Great start would be to build a bank of persuasive stories of improvement in health outcomes or process outcomes through uptake of guideline recommendations that make a difference to individuals, the community and the system is a great start.

I found this guide helpful when shaping a story; 

  • Start with a short statement to catch the readers attention, followed by 
  • What the problem was/is, 
  • Why it matters (to whom), 
  • How the change was implemented,  
  • Why that specific change, and finally 
  • the difference it made which echos the opening statement.

There are many amazing stories to share, not each example will be able to be replicated completely but there will be lessons to be learnt from each other. 

Sue

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by ericagbata@gmail.com at May 05. 2016

Previously Jenna McEwan wrote:

Overall Aim

The aim of this discussion (brainstorming session) is to get ideas from G-I-N members from all over the world on how to engage stakeholders for the Africa community.  We currently seek a variety of stakeholders including ministries of health, development agencies, healthcare consumers, clinicians and knowledge translation institutions. We hope that they can share their experiences and challenges and also link us with possible funders for some of our activities especially the capacity building in development and evaluation of clinical practice guidelines in Africa.

Topic: Stakeholder engagement

Objective:

i)     Learn from other communities and working groups their stakeholder engagement strategies

ii)    How to engage Stakeholders and turn it into a membership drive

iii)   Share experiences and challenges of stakeholder engagement and how to overcome them

iv)   How to put together stakeholder forums – methodologies to encourage membership

 

Target group:

i)       G-I-N Africa Community members

ii)     Working Groups especially LMIC

iii)    The entire G-I-N family (all G-I-N members)

 

Role of G-I-N members:

The members will give ideas and suggest strategies of stakeholder engagement and membership drives.

Timeline: March – end of April 2016

 Contact: Irene Maweu at imaweu@yahoo.com or Sue Huckson at charmanrd@gmail.com  

Re: Engaging Stakeholders for the G-I-N Africa Community

Posted by ericagbata@gmail.com at May 05. 2016

Hi, Have you considered the regulatory councils for health profession in the various countries as stakeholders!

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